Change iTunes Language and Store Location

I had the need to setup my sister-in-law’s phone today from an iPhone 4 to an iPhone 6. In the process we needed to change her iTunes AppStore language from her default to English, and also change her store location. Even though her language settings had already been changed to English in the usual settings location, iTunes still had her in a foreign store with her home language.
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accented characters in osx

selectable accents for the letter 'a'
selectable accents

UPDATE: I upgraded my OS X to Mountain Lion recently and I am not sure if it is as a result of the upgrade, or some other setting change I may have made, but now if I hold down a letter key for a short period, I get a tool-tip style box (right) that then allows me to select the appropriate accent. This doesn’t work for all letters, but it does make it more convenient.

I had a need to be able to print accented characters on certain letters, mainly being vowels, but potentially others as well. Most character sets have a limited set of accents, and most of them only apply to certain letters, and others don’t have the accents I want.

For example I want to print 5 main types of accents, being:

à á ā â ǎ

another example

x̀ x́ x̄ x̂ x̌

I’m using a macbook pro and pages in OSX, although this applies to any application, this is how I did it:

Open up System Preferences >> Personal >> Language and Text >> Input Sources

Once there, add a new keyboard, in this case I added “US Extended”.

Now to add some accents, I need to type the accent first, and then the character, but this only works for some letters (I suppose those that can be normally accented), but as you can see above, I have accented the letter ‘x’. So achieve this you must type the letter first and then [option]+[shift]+[code]. Not too hard, the five I need are:

  • a bar over the letter – ā – [option]+a then type the letter
  • a ‘v’ over the letter – ǎ – [option]+v then the letter
  • a ‘^’ over the letter – â – [option]+^ then the letter
  • a ‘`’ over the letter – à – [option]+` then the letter, and finally
  • a ‘ ́’ over the letter – á – [option]+e then the letter

^ <– is [shift]+6
` <– is the back tick, or key with the tilde (~) on it
́ <– is the quote mark key with single and double quotes [‘,”]

It was that simple :-)

note: I am learning the thai language and it is a very tonal language and inflections on letters are necessary to determine the tone of the word, hence I need this ability. These 5 marks above fit the bill perfectly, although the bar one really isn’t needed, but at least now I have the option of including it, or not including it.

Originally found here: http://tlt.its.psu.edu/suggestions/…

PPPPPPP – The 7 P’s

Prior Preparation and Planning Prevent Piss Poor Performance

I first travelled to Singapore in 2008 with a good friend of mine. While we were there we darted off to KL for a few days and took in some of the local sights, as well as attractions (there is a hidden pun there – sorry, private jokes are so bad, but if anyone knows Sissy, you’d know what I mean!) Anyway, we elected to go by VIP bus. We had heard about how good it was, and cheap, and so we did it. Without a lot of research, we jumped on one of the services (the name has seriously escaped the pair of us) and we were dropped off in some dingy bus terminal/car park with hordes of teksis (how Malaysian’s spell taxi) who were unwilling to run their meters for us.

So we elected to walk.

It was hot, uphill, long and we were dragging our luggage along for the ride. Did I mention it was hot?

We stayed at a hotel, Corus, pretty much across the road from the Petronas Towers. Not bad at the time, cheap, free wifi in their lobby (BTW they don’t have this any more), and not too bad. Especially for the price. The bad point was though, that another bus company ran VIP busses TO THE DOOR!!!

It’s now 2011.

I had forgotten a lot of the lessons learned in 2008 – especially the difficulty in organising and coordinating international travel between countries, that aren’t your home country, and that (despite official languages) don’t speak great EngRish). When I decided to visit KL with my wife I did look briefly at the Corus hotel, but quickly dismissed it for some reason (it wasn’t the wifi!), and went with the Novatel. Now this is no dig on the Novatel, they are a good Hotel and I would recommend them again, Well, we’re still here and haven’t had any problems so far. BUT, and here’s where the 7 P’s come into it… When it came to organising the bus (long after I had BOOKED the accommodation), I booked with the bus company that dropped us off at the Corus Hotel. But the Novatel is closer to the car park/bus station that Andrew and I had taken in 2008!

Is that irony?

No, it’s just those 7 bloody damn P’s

If programming languages were religions

C would be Judaism – it’s old and restrictive, but most of the world is familiar with its laws and respects them. The catch is, you can’t convert into it – you’re either into it from the start, or you will think that it’s insanity. Also, when things go wrong, many people are willing to blame the problems of the world on it.

Java would be Fundamentalist Christianity – it’s theoretically based on C, but it voids so many of the old laws that it doesn’t feel like the original at all. Instead, it adds its own set of rigid rules, which its followers believe to be far superior to the original. Not only are they certain that it’s the best language in the world, but they’re willing to burn those who disagree at the stake.

PHP would be Cafeteria Christianity – Fights with Java for the web market. It draws a few concepts from C and Java, but only those that it really likes. Maybe it’s not as coherent as other languages, but at least it leaves you with much more freedom and ostensibly keeps the core idea of the whole thing. Also, the whole concept of “goto hell” was abandoned.

C++ would be Islam – It takes C and not only keeps all its laws, but adds a very complex new set of laws on top of it. It’s so versatile that it can be used to be the foundation of anything, from great atrocities to beautiful works of art. Its followers are convinced that it is the ultimate universal language, and may be angered by those who disagree. Also, if you insult it or its founder, you’ll probably be threatened with death by more radical followers.

C# would be Mormonism – At first glance, it’s the same as Java, but at a closer look you realize that it’s controlled by a single corporation (which many Java followers believe to be evil), and that many theological concepts are quite different. You suspect that it’d probably be nice, if only all the followers of Java wouldn’t discriminate so much against you for following it.

Lisp would be Zen Buddhism – There is no syntax, there is no centralization of dogma, there are no deities to worship. The entire universe is there at your reach – if only you are enlightened enough to grasp it. Some say that it’s not a language at all; others say that it’s the only language that makes sense.

Haskell would be Taoism – It is so different from other languages that many people don’t understand how can anyone use it to produce anything useful. Its followers believe that it’s the true path to wisdom, but that wisdom is beyond the grasp of most mortals.

Erlang would be Hinduism – It’s another strange language that doesn’t look like it could be used for anything, but unlike most other modern languages, it’s built around the concept of multiple simultaneous deities.

Perl would be Voodoo – An incomprehensible series of arcane incantations that involve the blood of goats and permanently corrupt your soul. Often used when your boss requires you to do an urgent task at 21:00 on friday night.

Lua would be Wicca – A pantheistic language that can easily be adapted for different cultures and locations. Its code is very liberal, and allows for the use of techniques that might be described as magical by those used to more traditional languages. It has a strong connection to the moon.

Ruby would be Neo-Paganism – A mixture of different languages and ideas that was beaten together into something that might be identified as a language. Its adherents are growing fast, and although most people look at them suspiciously, they are mostly well-meaning people with no intention of harming anyone.

Python would be Humanism – It’s simple, unrestrictive, and all you need to follow it is common sense. Many of the followers claim to feel relieved from all the burden imposed by other languages, and that they have rediscovered the joy of programming. There are some who say that it is a form of pseudo-code.

COBOL would be Ancient Paganism – There was once a time when it ruled over a vast region and was important, but nowadays it’s almost dead, for the good of us all. Although many were scarred by the rituals demanded by its deities, there are some who insist on keeping it alive even today.

APL would be Scientology – There are many people who claim to follow it, but you’ve always suspected that it’s a huge and elaborate prank that got out of control.

LOLCODE would be Pastafarianism – An esoteric, Internet-born belief that nobody really takes seriously, despite all the efforts to develop and spread it.

Visual Basic would be Satanism – Except that you don’t REALLY need to sell your soul to be a Satanist…

Athism isn’t a religion, so the closest analogy is Assembler. It offers no quick or easy answers, but if you are prepared to think it through you can accomplish anything.

Located on:
http://greensboring.com/viewtopic.php?f=18&t=9619

Original source:
http://www.aegisub.net/2008/12/if-programming-languages-were-religions.html

Follow-up article:
http://www.aegisub.net/2008/12/if-programming-languages-were-religions_20.html